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Lawn Fertilization Experts - Lawn Matters Avon, OH

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Get a greener, healthier lawn with lawn fertilization services. Fertilizer is an important step in your lawn care routine that ensures your grass stays healthy and can fight off weeds all season long. With the right fertilization service from LawnMatters, your lawn will become strong enough to stand up to the heat of the summer and harsh Northeast Ohio winters, helping it to continue to thrive year after year.

Not only do weeds make your grass look patchy but as they grow, they block sunlight and steal water and nutrients away from your lawn. Our lawn care professionals treat your grass with a weed prevention spray in the spring to fight off weeds before they start, then use a post-emergent spray to spot treat weeds as needed, keeping your lawn weed-free throughout the season. Learn more about Getting Rid of Weeds Permanently.

LawnMatters offers a weed-free guarantee and complimentary service calls to all clients receiving a full lawn fertilization program.

  • For healthy, thick grass during the warmer seasons, start lawn fertilization and weed control in the spring.
  • Add more strength to endure foot traffic by continuing lawn fertilization and weed control throughout summer.
  • Use fertilizer and weed control in the fall to help your grass endure and survive cold weather.
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Things To Do in Avon, OH

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Things To Do

Located in Lorain County, Ohio, Avon is a thriving city known for its blend of suburban charm and modern amenities. Boasting a rich history dating back to its founding in the early 19th century, Avon offers residents a high quality of life with its strong sense of community and abundance of recreational opportunities.

The city’s picturesque landscapes, including parks, nature reserves, and the nearby French Creek, provide ample opportunities for outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, and picnicking. Avon is also home to a variety of shopping and dining options, ranging from quaint boutiques to popular chain restaurants.

With its excellent schools, safe neighborhoods, and convenient access to major highways, Avon is an ideal place to raise a family or settle down. Whether enjoying a day at the Avon Isle Park or attending one of the city’s many community events, residents of Avon take pride in their vibrant and welcoming community.

Avon, OH Blog Posts

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Spring Yard Clean Up Checklist

Spring Yard Clean Up Checklist

When spring arrives, getting back to work in your yard can be overwhelming. Where do you even start?

Here is our Spring Yard Clean Up Checklist to help you prepare your lawn before starting your lawn care schedule:

Step 1. First things first, rake that yard

The first task that needs to be done is to get everything off your yard. Before you do anything else you need to rake up any leaves that you missed (or just didn’t feel like raking) in the fall. Anything sitting on your grass can be a breeding ground for diseases such as snow mold or home to overwintering pests. If you have a gravel driveway look out for piles of gravel pushed up by the snow plow. Rake it back into your driveway before your lawn mower finds it.

Step 2. Clean out the gutters

Clean out the gutters to get your home and lawn ready for spring in Cleveland, OH

Fall is when gutters get clogged the most. Especially if you live in a wooded area or have a lot of deciduous trees in your yard. Leaves can quickly clog the small drains in your gutters which can retain water. When that water freezes the weight can rip the gutters right off your house. In the spring and summer, it becomes breeding grounds for mosquitos. So get up there and clean those gutters out!

Step 3. Bring your irrigation system online

If you have an irrigation system then I hope you properly winterized it last fall. To turn on your sprinkler system just turn on the main valve, check for leaks, and then one-by-one turn on the individual sprinkler valves. If you aren’t sure about this process, call a professional.

Step 4. Reduce, reuse, compost

This rich compost soil will be great for preparing your spring garden in Cleveland, OH.

If you have a compost bin or pile then spring is a great time to add to it. All those leaves, twigs, and gutter leaves make excellent compost that can be used in flower beds, around trees, or in your garden.

Step 5. Seed bald spots

Ok, you’ve gotten your yard raked. Now you can assess the damage that winter has done to your yard. Under those piles of leaves and gravel, there may be dead spots. Don’t worry, it can be fixed. Rake the area and let it dry out before adding a layer of compost. Finally, cover the area with seed. The patch should disappear in no time.

All the chores that need to be done in the spring can be overwhelming. Why not get a little help so you can enjoy the things you like to do. Contact LawnMatters and let us do the hard work for you or give us a call at (440) 834 – 1255 for more information!

How to Get Your Lawn Ready for Spring: 7 Lawn Care Tips

How to Get Your Lawn Ready for Spring: 7 Lawn Care Tips

With spring finally upon us in Northeast Ohio, now is the time to start enjoying the outdoors again. That means you need to get your outdoor spaces in shape. While there are plenty of obvious things to do, here are a few items that can have big impact on your yard’s health and appearance.

Your lawn especially needs attention in the spring, if you want it to be vibrantly green later. Follow these lawn care tips for a healthy, strong lawn that will look amazing all the way into fall.

1. Remove debris from your yard

During the winter, your yard can start to look like a real wreck. You don’t see it, because a nice blanket of snow covers everything up. Once the weather warms up, you start to notice leaves, tree branches, and other debris scattered around. Put on your heavy work gloves, grab a rake and some trash bags, then remove all the unsightly debris before doing anything else.

2. Check your trees and shrubs for dead branches

Check over your trees and shrubs for any dead growth. If you don’t see buds or signs of life on a branch, you can always scrape off a small section of bark to look for green below, indicating it’s still alive. Now is a great time to trim back undesirable growth on trees and shrubs, before insects become too active and the daytime heat is intense. If you’re dealing with a flowering shrub, wait until after the plant flowers to trim anything.

3. Check your landscape for damage

With the winter snow receded, you might discover raised flower beds, planters, pots, etc. are broken. If you can fix items by driving some nails into boards, for example, now’s the time to do just that. This is also a good time to build borders around your beds and install any other structures. If you’re establishing a new bed, till the ground to soften it up in preparation for planting.

4. Rake your lawn

With the debris off your lawn, it’s time to thin out the thatch. The layer of grass debris, like stalks and roots, can be a barrier between the soil and nutrients as well as water. In other words, you need to thin out thatch so your grass keeps growing properly and maintains its health.

5. Remove debris from your flower beds

You’ll need to remove dead leaves and other debris from your flower beds, but the work doesn’t stop there. Use scissors to trim off dead stalks on perennials and ornamental grasses, which maybe you missed in the late fall. Next, you want to dig out weeds and any plants that didn’t make it through the winter. Spread compost around the living plants and anywhere you want to put something new. This will ensure the soil stays rich and vibrant.

6. Start planting with trees, shrubs and perennials

When putting new plants in your yard, timing is everything. If it’s still early spring, you want to stick with trees, shrubs, and perennials that are particularly tough. Temperatures can dip pretty low at times, so you want to avoid planting anything that can’t handle those conditions. Once the last frost date has passed, you’re free to plant whatever you like.

7. Apply pre-emergent and fertilizer

Instead of waiting until you have a problem with weeds in your lawn, apply a quality pre-emergent to control crabgrass, dandelions, and more in spring. You should also fertilize the lawn.

Contact LawnMatters

LawnMatters offers professional lawn care services for every season. If you have questions about your lawn, contact us here or give us a call:

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

Common Spiders in Ohio & How to Keep Them Out of Your House

Common Spiders in Ohio & How to Keep Them Out of Your House

Spiders. There’s something about them that naturally invokes a deep fear. Just the sight of one sitting in the ceiling corner can bring squeals from the most macho of men.

Here’s a list of a few of a few spiders that are common in Ohio:

1. Black Widow

Ohio is home to two species of black widow – Southern and Northern. Females, which are larger than males, are black with a red hourglass shape underneath their abdomens. The males are generally lighter in color and have orange or red markings. The female’s bite is extremely dangerous, affecting the victim’s nervous system and causing pain, cramps, tremor, vomiting, dizziness, and respiratory difficulties. The black widow can be found in empty buildings, the garage, and the home.

2. Bold Jumping Spider

The Bold Jumping Spider is common in Northeast Ohio and relatively harmless. The jumping spider has eight eyes that work in conjunction to help it clearly define prey and distance. The anterior eyes can see acutely, forming clear images with binocular-like focus, while the lateral eyes judge distances. So they can see every breath you take while you’re sleeping and time their jump onto you with perfect precision. Don’t worry too much, though. The jumping spider will likely only bite when it feels threatened, and the pain is comparable to a bee sting.

3. Black & Yellow Garden Spider

Black with orange or yellow markings, the Black and Yellow Garden Spider is an intimidating looking spider. And with good reason, too. Though they aren’t aggressive, they will bite if they feel threatened. Luckily, the venom is not harmful to humans and is only about as painful as a bee sting. They prefer flowery areas in the sun and feed on small flying insects like flies and grasshoppers. Being that they prefer gardens, they do sometimes wander into the nearby home.

4. Brown Recluse

The Brown Recluse Spider should be avoided if found in your Northeast Ohio garage, basement, or storage area. The Brown Recluse Spider is one of the most feared spiders in the US. And for good reason. If not deadly, their bite can kill several inches (in diameter) of tissue in humans, necessitating skin grafts. The bite is identified by a developed crust and surrounding red skin. Typically, the brown recluse can be found in basements or storage areas, but it also has been known to venture into clothing or folded towels. Disturbing it in any way can prompt a bite.

5. Wolf Spider

Rather than spinning a web for its prey to get caught in, the wolf spider patiently waits for its prey to pass by before lunging on it and burying its mandibles deep. It prefers insects like grasshoppers and ants, as well as other spiders, for its meals. Colored brown, grey, and black to perfectly camouflage into the leaf litter where it likes to hide, the wolf spider can be incredibly hard to spot. A very common spider in Ohio, they are typically found in forests and fields, but can occasionally wander into the home.

 

How to Keep Spiders Out of Your House

Like most things, prevention is the best cure. And nothing prevents spiders coming into the home like LawnMatters’ Perimeter Pest Control ProgramContact us to learn more!

How to Prevent Weeds from Growing in Your Lawn

How to Prevent Weeds from Growing in Your Lawn

Spring is an exciting time – the grass is growing, flowers are blooming, but unfortunately, those pesky weeds are starting to sprout around your home. Weeds steal essential nutrients from your grass and plants, so when they start sprouting, you have to be ready. Knowing how to prevent early spring weeds is important to the overall health and appearance of your lawn and landscape.

Here are tips for weed control, and what you need to know about how to eliminate weeds from your yard:

1. Use pre-emergent herbicide before weeds begin sprouting

The first step in dealing with early spring weeds is actually a preventative measure: a pre-emergent herbicide application. Pre-emergent herbicides don’t entirely stop weed germination (the spread of weeds), but do an effective job in controlling it. An early spring pre-emergent application along with broad leaf weed control and fertilizer, will put a stop to those common summer weeds like crabgrass, thistle, dandelion, and chickweed.

2. If weeds have started sprouting throughout your lawn, use a post-emergent herbicide

If weeds have already sprouted, use a post-emergent herbicide. This herbicide should be sprayed directly on the target weed, as this will systematically attack the weeds root system resulting in complete elimination.

There are two different types of post-emergent herbicides, each proving their own benefits:

1. Systematic herbicides – Most effective at controlling perennial weeds. The product will be absorbed into the weeds, destroying both the visible and invisible portions of the target weed.

2. Contact herbicides – Most effective at controlling annual weeds. They kill the weeds on contact, making it impossible for the plant to continue to receive essential nutrients for growth and germination.

3. Hand-pull weeds to remove them from your lawn and landscape

Pulling weeds from your garden – it’s one of the most tedious tasks you will take on all spring, but it also happens to be one of the most effective. Simply walking through your lawn and landscape and hand-pulling any weeds you see. Keep in mind, when you hand-pull the weeds, you have to ensure the roots get pulled as well or else the weed will be back in no time.

Waiting for a wet day can help as damp soil makes the weeds and their root systems easier to pull. If you pull the weed but miss the root, use a gardening tool to dig deep and remove the entirety of the weed as well.

4. Create a custom weed control program with a lawn care professional

No matter the time of year, status of the weeds, or the weather, one of the best ways to control those pesky springtime weeds is to call the experts in weed control at LawnMatters. Our weed prevention and control program destroys common Ohio weeds, right down to their roots.

If you’re looking to eliminate and prevent weeds from taking over this spring, contact us here or give us a call at (440) 834-1255. Protect your lawn and landscape today!

Brooklyn Heights OH Lawn Care 101

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Low-maintenance Plants: What are the easiest outdoor plants to take care of?

Low-maintenance Plants: What are the easiest outdoor plants to take care of?

Do you desperately try time after time to grow beautiful plants but can never succeed? Don’t give up hope! There’s still a good chance you can turn your thumbs from brown to green this summer if you choose the right plants.

Growing a nice garden gives you a sense of accomplishment and can become a hobby that you learn to cherish after time. Some people make it look easy and you may wonder what you’re doing wrong. In the big picture, it may not be all your fault, so cut yourself some slack.

Plants are finicky and know what they like and don’t like. There are a million different things that can factor into a plants wellbeing that you don’t have too much control of. The variables go on and on: nutrients and pH in the soil, the amount of sunlight in your given area, rain levels per season and temperature spikes are just a few issues to hopefully help you realize that a beautiful garden is more than a quick trip to the local garden center. Regardless of variables however, there are a few plants that do well with minimal TLC and will reward you and visitors with something you can be proud of.

Here is a list of five low maintenance plants you can use for landscaping:

1. (Echinacea): Coneflowers

These beautiful and unique looking flowers will grow tall from two to five feet high and about two feet in width. Your soil will have to be considered well drained as they don’t do well in super moist areas, but they thrive in partial shade as well as full on direct sunlight. Coneflowers are known for their bright colors that help attract butterflies, bees and birds and are also great for creating a homemade bouquet. You can find them in the color purple, yellow, orange, white, crimson, and pink. You can choose a variety and color that you think will fit well with your tastes and your landscape. There are also shorter ones available in the ‘POW WOW’ and ‘SOMBREO’ Series

2. (Cosmos bipinnatus): Cosmos

These flowers have an awesome risk to reward ratio in the sense that they’re super cheap and grow extremely well from seed, meaning that for minimal monetary output you can throw down some seeds in the spring and have a burst of colorful full flowers before you even realize it. They can grow to about six feet high and are considered annuals, however, they usually reseed on their own.

3. (Hemerocallis): Daylilies

These plants have a tremendous amount of character and display a unique beauty unto themselves. They’re extremely tough and can withstand floods, droughts and salt. Daylilies can be used to help erosion and are effective at helping hillsides stay intact when planted in groups. These plants grow from ten inches to four feet tall and do well in direct sun and partial shade. They flower for a long time during the summer while other perennials have already flowered or only flower for a couple of weeks. They help attract hummingbirds and butterflies with their bright colors. You should try and divide them every three to five years as they reproduce quite well. Split ‘em up and give ‘em. They make great gifts!

4. Succulents

Succulents are very low maintenance. Hens and Chicks specifically are super cool looking as they emulate an Arizona look here in the Northwest. Succulents are very hard to kill, just make sure their feet are not too wet! They’re perennials and will come back year after year and spread over ground area. They’re unique in the sense that their root systems are shallow, which allows you to get creative and place them in different kinds of containers. Put them in an abandoned bird bath or lawn ornament or even an old pair of boots!

5. Hostas

If you have a garden that’s predominantly covered by shade, then you should consider adding some Hostas. They bring rich foliage and a variety of textures and colors to your collection of plants. Hosta’s grow from four inches to around three (four) feet high and can spread out in width to around six feet wide if you let them go. They bloom flowers that are lavender, white or deep purple. They should be divided annually as they spread fast. Be sure not to give them too much water although they do withstand relatively moist soil. Enjoy researching the many variety’s, cultivars and hybrids. You can fill an entire garden with the many different choices.

 

If you have questions or need help in your yard, contact LawnMatters.

Poisonous Plants in Ohio – What Do Poisonous Plants Look Like?

Poisonous Plants in Ohio – What Do Poisonous Plants Look Like?

So you’ve got your chainsaw, your clippers, and everything else you need to start that backyard cleanup. Whether you are clearing that untamed area of your yard or just taking out a few trees, there are hidden dangers that you might be overlooking: poisonous plants.

Most people get poison ivy or its nasty relatives because they don’t know what it looks like. So, before you go ripping down vines and pulling up shrubs, take the time to look for these plants before they harm you or somebody you know.

What does poison ivy look like?

Everyone knows that poison ivy is some nasty stuff, but do you really know how to identify poison ivy? The best way to protect yourself from weeks of painful itching is to arm yourself with knowledge.

At first glance, poison ivy may look just like any other harmless vine growing up a tree trunk or just another common weed on the ground. The easiest way to tell poison ivy apart from other plants is that it always has three leaves. One large leaf with two smaller ones sprouting from the side. The leaves can be smooth or serrated on the edges, and have pointed tips. The stems are reddish in the spring, green in summer, and yellow/orange in the fall.

The entire plant secretes a substance called urushiol which, when it comes into contact with human skin, can cause a severe allergic reaction in the form of itchy blisters that can last weeks.

What does poison oak look like?

Poison oak looks like and often grows alongside poison ivy. The leaves of poison oak, however, look more lobed, like an oak tree, but it’s essentially just as potent and dangerous as poison ivy.

If you are working in overgrown areas, be sure to dress for it. Wear long pants, sleeves, and gloves. Throw all the clothes in the wash immediately afterward and take a shower.

Urushiol is nothing to mess around with. The oils can linger on surfaces of wood and clothes for a long time. Never burn wood with poison ivy or that’s recently had poison ivy or poison oak. Breathing urushiol is not a pleasant experience and you can end up with an extremely painful rash in your mouth and throat.

What does giant hogweed look like?

Giant hogweed is one of the poisonous plants to watch for in Ohio, as this plant can cause permanent blindness and very painful rashes on those who touch it.

You may not have heard of giant hogweed, but it has been a growing concern in the United States in recent years. Giant hogweed has been reported in parts of Ohio and is listed on the federal and Ohio noxious weed list. That means that this plant is so serious that it’s illegal to sell, transport, or propagate.

This wicked weed makes poison ivy look like a mild sunburn. The sap of giant hogweed can cause severe burns and even permanent blindness. No, this is not a weed you want to pull out of your garden by accident.

Thankfully, identifying giant hogweed is pretty easy. It resembles cow parsnip or wild carrots with an umbrella of small white flower clusters. The main difference is that giant hogweed can grow up to 15 feet tall and its leaves are much bigger.

What should I do if I see a poisonous plant in growing in my yard?

When you notice a poisonous plant growing in your yard, it is best to call a professional who can safely remove it for you. If you have questions or need help in your yard, contact LawnMatters or request a quote today.

Common Lawn Diseases That Occur in Spring

Common Lawn Diseases That Occur in Spring

Nobody likes seeing dying patches of grass in their lawn. Often times, these dying patches of grass are the results of lawn disease or lawn fungus. It’s an unsightly view that, if not dealt with quickly, can ruin an entire lawn.

The good news is you can be ready! By identifying these diseases early, you can stop them before they spread. Ultimately saving your lawn and saving you time and money!

 

Here’s how to identify common lawn diseases that can occur in spring

1. Fairy Ring (Marasmius Oreades)

Fairy ring is a most common lawn disease that appears in spring due to the fact that it thrives in cool, rainy weather. This is an easy lawn disease to identify, as white mushrooms can appear on the outside edges of the ring. The grass will also turn tan with slight hints of green within. These irregular rings are caused by the fungi’s release of nitrogen which doesn’t affect the grass itself but, breaks down important nutrients in the soil.

What causes fairy rings?

Fairy ring is caused by dead or dying organic matter in the soil, which serves as the starting point for this fungus. Thatch also serves as the fuel to this fungi’s flame. The key to fairy ring prevention involves keeping a clean yard, dethatching, and aerating to alleviate soil compaction and remove dead organic matter within the grass.

 

2. Brown Patch (Rhizoctonia Solani)

Affecting cool-seasoned grasses like bluegrass and bentgrasses, brown patch is one of the most common late spring/early summer lawn diseases. It looks like large circular and irregular patches of dead grass. The grass often appears like it has suffered from drought and dried out. The biggest problem you will face with brown patch is that it spreads at a rapid pace. As soon as you notice those irregular patches of dead/dry grass on your lawn, you’ll want to act immediately.

How to prevent brown patches on your lawn:

The key to brown patch prevention is good lawn care practices, especially when it comes to watering. Never over-water your lawn, as sitting moisture can spark the brown patch fungus. Also, make sure your lawn is draining water properly. If it is not, it may be the result of thatch buildup, which can be fixed by dethatching and aerating!

 

3. Dollar Spot (Clarireedia Homoeocarpa)

Dollar spot is another common lawn disease that occurs in spring. Also affecting cool-seasoned grasses like bermudagrass and fescue, dollar spot is most apparent in the summer when temperatures rise rapidly and the humidity is high. Dollar spot looks like small patches of dead grass on your lawn (about the size of a dollar coin). These dead patches will be a light tan, almost appearing as if they’re a bleached-white. This disease is most prevalent after cool, rainy nights.

How to treat dollar spots on your lawn:

The key to dollar spot prevention is proper lawn care practices. If dollar spot becomes apparent in your lawn, apply a fungicide as this will aid in fighting the disease while helping the grass recover quickly. Also, keep your lawn clear of leaves and debris as they can trap moisture for extended periods of time, sparking fungi like dollar spot.

 

4. Red Thread (Laetisaria Fuciformis) – Most Common in the Spring

Red thread fungus thrives in the spring where moisture levels are high and temperatures are mild. This fungus is one of the easiest to correct as the nitrogen in fertilizer helps it “grow out”. As soon as red thread is identified, preventative measures should be put in place right away.

How to treat Red Thread fungus on your lawn:

The good news is red thread is one of the easiest lawn diseases to identify. It will appear as small-medium irregular patches of dead grass, however up close you will see that there is a red coloring to the affected areas (this is the fungus growing). The best way to treat red thread is to apply a fungicide, but a balanced fertilizer that is slightly higher in nitrogen will also aid in red thread prevention.

 

Best Cultural Practices to Avoid Lawn Disease

  1. Mow grass to a minimum of 3″
  2. Always water in the morning – watering at night promotes lawn diseases
  3. Like any lawn issue, if you notice something that doesn’t look right, call us right away. The quicker we can diagnose the issue, the better chance we have at correcting it quickly.

 

Lawn Disease Prevention & Control Services

LawnMatters offers both preventative and curative fungicide treatments for lawn diseases. Contact us here, or call (440) 834-1255 to hear more about how we can help you eliminate AND prevent lawn diseases and lawn fungus from affecting your lawn!

List of Bugs That Can Be Dangerous to Pets

List of Bugs That Can Be Dangerous to Pets

Bugs and pests are a major nuisance to humans. However, many people don’t realize that unwanted critters can also pose a potential health risk to our beloved pets as well.

Here is a list of the common bugs and pests that you should keep away from your pets:

1. Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes can transmit numerous diseases to humans, such as EEE and the Zika virus. However, these bloodthirsty vermin can also pass on heartworm to our cats and dogs. When left untreated, heartworm can prove fatal in a very short amount of time, making it essential to treat your yard and perimeter to reduce swarms in your yard.

2. Fleas

Fleas are so common that many of us assume they are innocuous to our pets. Unfortunately, some cats and dogs are allergic to fleabites. Over time, these bites can develop into allergic dermatitis, which can lead to irritating skin sores and hairless areas on the animal.

3. Ticks

Ticks thrive in wooded areas and patches of long-grasses, making it critical to check your pets as soon as they come back inside. These tiny parasites can cause a slew of pet sicknesses and health conditions including anemia, Lyme disease, and even paralysis. Symptoms of a tick bit may include a change in their bark, vomiting, and heavy breathing.

4. Venomous spiders

There are two poisonous spiders here in the U.S.: the black widow and the brown recluse. Both species can prove extremely dangerous to animals, particularly smaller pets such as cats and toy or teacup breed dogs; just a single bite from these spiders can cause significant neuromuscular damage.

5. Bees

At best, a bee sting is uncomfortable for pets. At worst, certain bees, like yellow jackets and wasps, can cause an allergic reaction that includes severe mouth pain, swelling, respiratory distress, and even seizures.

6. Cockroaches

Most cockroaches will flee at the sight of a dog or cat. However, sometimes, unlucky pets may ingest a cockroach, resulting in stomach worms for our furry friends.

7. Ants

Ants are more than an everyday annoyance in our backyards. These arduous little crawlers can inflict several irritating bites on our cats and dogs in a very short amount of time. Fire ant swarms are especially threatening to our pets. Fire ants’ venom can induce an allergic reaction, which is extremely painful. When left untreated fire ants can even lead to death.

8. Stink bugs

Think that the worst part about a stink bug is their unsavory scent? Think again. Pets that ingest stink bugs can suffer from an upset stomach, diarrhea, and vomiting. In some severe cases, eating a stink bug may even require surgery.

How to Protect Pets from Bugs

LawnMatters offers a full suite of insect and pest control services that can minimize swarms in your backyard to help keep your family and pets safe from unwanted property and perimeter guests.

Contact us today to learn more!

Benefits of Aerating and Overseeding Your Lawn

Benefits of Aerating and Overseeding Your Lawn

Caring for your Northeast Ohio lawn can feel like a full-time job. Your grass and beds need water, fertilizer, and access to nutrient-enriched soil for vibrant, hardy growth. And then, there’s all the mowing. Keeping your grass at the right length throughout the summer helps it fight off pests and drought conditions, so it thrives all season long. While all of these tasks play a key role in any well-maintained property, there’s still one crucial treatment to consider to ensure your Ohio lawn looks it’s very best at all times: core aeration and seeding.

Core aeration systemically removes small plugs or “cores” from the soil to help redistribute essential nutrients, air, and moisture to root systems throughout the property. Overseeding at the time of core aeration ensures new grass seed is accessing the nutrient rich soil. Including this critical lawn care application to your home or business, yields a multitude of benefits that make it a must for Ohio property owners.

Core aeration and overseeding’s many advantages include:

1. Minimizing soil compaction and thatch

Here in Ohio, we tend to live our lives outdoors throughout the warmer seasonal months. However, there’s a price to pay for the excessive foot (and tire and paw) traffic our lawn endures when the temperatures start to rise. Over time, the ground begins to condense, causing excessive soil compaction and even thatch. Core aeration breaks up the soil, letting your lawn breathe. This new circulation of fresh air eliminates compaction for a healthier, stronger yard.

2. Increasing fertilizer impact

Proper fertilization is important; however, without consistent core aeration, the nutrients found in your fertilizer may never actually get to the soil and root systems. Removing plugs across the lawn increases the likelihood of your fertilizer reaching where it’s needed most for optimal overall impact. Best of all, efficient fertilizer distribution often means you may need less of the product during future treatments.

3. Preventing lawn disease

Thatch forces water and moisture to pool at the surface of your lawn. Eventually, the wet top layer of your property may start to die and rot, creating a perfect storm for a wide range of fungal conditions. Aeration eliminates thatch buildup, allowing water to soak into the soil rather than collect at the surface. Reducing excessive water decreases the chance of fungus, effectively helping your property fight off lawn disease. Bonus: Proper drainage also helps prevent damage caused by flooding and water runoff. Core aeration ensures that moisture flows right down to the roots where it can have the most significant impact on your grass and gardens.

4. Creating a thicker, heathier lawn

Adding grass seed to your existing lawn – overseeding – helps reduce the appearance of damage caused by foot traffic, lawn diseases, drought and insects. Overseeding at the time of core aeration ensures the new grass seeds are making good contact with the nutrient rich soil, allowing for optimal growing conditions. In addition to having a fuller, healthier lawn because of overseeding, as the grass thickens, it makes it harder for weeds to grow.

5. Getting your grass winter ready

It’s no secret that, here in Ohio, winter is tough. A professional core aeration application ignites rigorous root growth and strength, getting your entire lawn winter ready before the first flakes begin to fall.

 

LawnMatters Aeration and Overseeding Services

LawnMatters specializes in core aeration and overseeding services for Northeast Ohio home and business owners. Contact our team of lawn and turf care professionals to schedule your treatment today.

Snow Mold – What is it and how to prevent it

Snow Mold – What is it and how to prevent it

How to prevent snow moldWith winter fast approaching we all know what that means: snow, and probably lots of it. Lawns in the midwest could be covered in the white stuff for months. This means, come springtime, we may have a problem: snow mold.

What is snow mold?

Snow mold is a fungus that grows in circular patches on your lawn. It typically appears after the snow melts in late winter or early spring, but doesn’t always require snow to form. It comes in two varieties: Gray (Typhula blight) and Pink (Fusarium patch).

What does snow mold look like?

1. Gray snow mold

Gray snow mold is the less destructive of the two. It will appear in circular patches of flattened, discolored grass with a gray web of fungus growing over top. Typically, it only damages the blades of the grass, not getting down into the roots.

2. Pink snow mold

Pink snow mold is the more serious of the two and it doesn’t even need snow to form. After an extended period of cool wet weather, usually in the fall, you may start to notice red/brown or orange spots appearing on your lawn. These will grow as winter progresses until it takes over large portions of your lawn. This mold is worse than the gray variant because it will go after the crowns and roots of your grass, effectively killing it.

Tips for snow mold prevention

Prevention is the key to eliminating snow mold. There are a number of methods that have proven successful in the battle against the mold:

1. Fungicide treatment

The best way is to have your lawn professionally treated with a fungicide. This is ideally done in the late fall, before the first snow of the year. This should protect your lawn throughout the winter and into the spring. LawnMatters offers an excellent snow mold prevention treatment.

2. Don’t over water your lawn

Mold thrives on moisture so it is important to ration the amount of water you give your lawn as the temperatures drop. Giving your grass the bare minimum that it requires is another great way to prevent snow mold.

3. Continue to mow your lawn in fall

Make sure that you are mowing your lawn throughout the fall. Keeping the grass between 2.5 – 3 inches will make your lawn less susceptible to disease and mold. Your final mow of the year should be kept short at 2″.

4. Clear your lawn of piles of leaves and snow

In the fall it’s important to remove any piles of wet leaves. This will reduce the amount of unnecessary moisture building up on your lawn.

The same goes for piles of snow. When shoveling your driveway or sidewalk try to avoid making large piles of snow in your lawn as they will take a much longer time to melt, offering more time for the snow mold to develop.

 

Prevent Snow Mold with LawnMatters

Worried about snow mold? LawnMatters has everything you need to keep the fungus at bay, contact us today!

How to Protect Trees and Shrubs in Winter

How to Protect Trees and Shrubs in Winter

Winter in Ohio… One day it will be 40 degrees and sunny, and the next day it’ll be 15 degrees and you find yourself in the midst of a snowstorm. You just never know what the Northeast Ohio winter will bring. Author R. Allen Woods put it best when he said, “if you don’t like the weather in Ohio, just wait 15 minutes!”

One thing we know for sure is that with Ohio winters come a plethora of threats to our trees and shrubs. Heavy snow, pests and critters, cold winds, the sun, and everything in between. Knowing how to best protect your trees and shrubs through the winter season is imperative, as it ultimately leads to a beautiful (and thriving) landscape come spring.

Spray your trees and shrubs with an anti-transpirant to prevent moisture loss.

Another threat your trees and shrubs are facing this winter are the freezing cold winds. Being as close to Lake Erie as we are, these winds are very common. They can suck the moisture from exposed trees and shrubs, which can result in wind burn, drought, and ultimately winter kill.

The best way to combat these issues is to wilt proof your trees and shrubs with an anti-transpirant. Wilt proofing adds a protective coating to the branches and stems, which ensures the moisture does not escape during high-stress times.

Wrap your trees with tree wrap to prevent permanent visible damage

Tree wrap protects the bark from damage caused by critters (rabbits and deer), insects, and the wind. The sun can also be a threat to your trees and shrubs this winter. The main disease caused by the sun is called sunscald. This is where the bark of the tree freezes, and then is rapidly warmed up by the sun, which results in permanent visible damage.

 

Contact LawnMatters for Tree and Shrub Care Services

At LawnMatters we understand the value your trees and shrubs bring to your landscape. That’s why protecting them from winter damage is essential! Our professionals are readily equipped with the knowledge to best help you. Contact us or give us a call at (440) 834-1255 to hear more about our tree and shrub care services, and how to best protect your landscape this winter!

How to Fertilize Large Trees with Deep Root Feeding

How to Fertilize Large Trees with Deep Root Feeding

Trees are a valuable investment to your property. They are also an important natural resource. So it’s important that they get the nutrients to grow strong and healthy. There are two effective ways to fertilize trees: Deep Root Injection and Surface Drench Feeding. Both methods are highly effective and delivers fertilizer to where it matters, the roots. Rest assured our Tree & Shrub applicators know which method is best for your landscape!

Deep root fertilization benefits

A tree’s needs are constantly changing due to weather and environmental factors. Deep root feeding helps ensure trees are receiving the nutrients they need to flourish. The process starts by injecting water, fertilizers, insecticides and other soil enhancers directly into a tree’s root system.

This method encourages tree and shrub health throughout the year. Because fertilizer is injected under high pressure directly into the roots it eliminates competition from other plants. In addition, deep root feeding promotes healthier more attractive trees, provides an increased resistance to diseases, and insects. The benefits are long-lasting and significant.

 

Contact LawnMatters for Tree and Shrub Care

Keep your trees healthy year after year with LawnMatters’ tree and shrub services or contact us to learn more.

When to Fertilize Your Lawn

When to Fertilize Your Lawn

Fertilizer is an important step in your lawn care routine that ensures your grass stays healthy and strong, and can fight off weeds all season long. Help your lawn get the nutrients it needs to thrive year-round with this lawn fertilization schedule:

Your first fertilizer application should take place in early spring.

Fertilize your lawn in early spring when your grass first begins to grow. In Northeast Ohio, this is typically between March and April when temperatures start consistently staying near 50 degrees. Also consider a weed control application at the same time. Getting ahead of weeds before they germinate can help prevent them from taking over your lawn. A second application of both products should be used in late spring before it gets too hot.

Should I water my lawn after fertilizing?

To get the maximum results, it is best to water within 48 hours after an application. This helps nutrients get absorbed into the soil and fertilizer off blades of grass, preventing leaf burn.

Your last two fertilizer applications should take place in the fall.

Fertilizing your lawn in fall helps restore damage that was caused by the stress of summer heat, promotes nutrient storage for use in the winter, and supports healthy root growth, which creates a healthier lawn in spring. It is best to plan for two fertilizer applications between late August and November. Leverage winter’s severe weather to help get rid of weeds by also scheduling a weed control application in the fall.

 

Contact LawnMatters

If you have questions about your lawn fertilization schedule or weed control applicationscontact the lawn care experts at LawnMatters.

Tips to Improve Your Lawn

Tips to Improve Your Lawn

The time to start thinking about taking the right steps to improve your lawn isn’t in the middle of the summer, or once you notice trouble spots. Instead, be proactive and take care of your lawn in the early spring. You’ll see the benefits of this move all the way into the fall when the grass is healthy, green, and full.

LawnMatters has the expertise to help you get a strong start in the early spring when many problems are easiest to manage. Just imagine playing, relaxing, and enjoying your immaculate lawn the entire summer.

Start fertilizer in early spring

After the harshness of winter, your lawn needs extra nutritional support. Nutrients in the soil become depleted and need to be replenished Without the right nutrients like potassium and nitrogen, your lawn will suffer. Struggling lawns are more susceptible to disease, insect infestations, and weeds.

Healthy lawns need less watering and endure the heat of the summer better. Don’t wait for your lawn to shows signs that it needs fertilizer. Keep it looking great by getting the right fertilizer in the soil early in the spring.

Start weed control in early spring

Weeds start growing in the early spring, so don’t wait until you have a full-scale explosion of them in your lawn. Weeds use the water your grass needs. They can crowd out your grass, making it look patchy. As weeds grow, they block sunlight and steal nutrients in the soil, harming the health of your lawn further.

Weeds spread quickly, meaning they can take over a yard in a matter of weeks. Too often, people apply weed control methods in the late spring or early summer, after the weeds have become a problem. In northeast Ohio, weeds like crabgrass, dandelions, clover, etc. germinate early, springing to life as soon as the weather starts to warm. This means your lawn is already suffering in the early spring. Give the grass a much-needed boost by using LawnMatters’ professional weed control & weed preventative service. We’ll eliminate weeds in your lawn, which in turn means you’ll be dealing with fewer problems in the summer and fall.

Contact LawnMatters and schedule an appointment today.

When Should You Aerate Your Lawn?

When Should You Aerate Your Lawn?


Because we have cool season grasses in Northeast Ohio, the best time to aerate your lawn is early spring or early fall. Timing aeration during the active growing season in your region ensures grass grows where the soil has been exposed.

Why Aerate Your Lawn?

Compacted soil from frequent activity and thatch, or the appearance of brown and gray buildup from dead roots, stems, and grass, leaves less room for water to flow to your lawn’s roots. Aeration breaks up soil compaction and thatch by removing small plugs or “cores” from the soil, allowing essential nutrients like air, water, and fertilizer to penetrate the root system, which creates a stronger, healthier lawn.

If you are struggling with thinning grass, the perfect time to overseed, or add seed to existing grass, is right after core aeration. This ensures the new grass seeds make good contact with the nutrient rich soil, allowing for optimal growing conditions. In addition to a fuller, healthier lawn, as the grass thickens, it makes it harder for weeds to grow. You can read more about the benefits of aerating and overseeding your lawn here.

How to Aerate Your Lawn

If you are planning a DIY lawn aeration, you can typically rent an aerator from a local lawn and garden store. Before starting, note where any sprinkler heads are in your lawn so you do not run them over and cause damage. Keep in mind it is best to water your lawn one to two days before you aerate to soften the soil.  Be sure to follow the equipment instructions carefully and go over sections in a perpendicular direction to ensure you are breaking up the right amount of soil. Finally, once you have completed aerating, water your lawn.

LawnMatters offers professional Lawn Aeration and Overseeding Services and can offer expert advice on how to get a greener, healthier lawn. If you have questions, contact us here or give us a call:

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

Mosquito Control for Your Yard

Mosquito Control for Your Yard

Summers in Northeast Ohio mean barbeques, backyard celebrations, and taking every opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. But nothing can get in the way of R & R quite like a yard full of mosquitoes. Not only are these pests a nuisance, but they can also carry harmful diseases that can be transmitted to your family and pets. Reduce the number of mosquitoes that make their way into your backyard this summer with these three easy mosquito control tips:

Three Mosquito Control Tips:

1. Remove standing water

Prevent mosquitoes from laying eggs around your yard by removing standing water. Be sure to check containers, pots, or toys that could be holding onto moisture after it rains – these pests breed in very small amounts of water.

2. Mow your grass regularly

Mosquitoes thrive in cool, dark spots, like tall grass, and piles of leaves and brush. Mowing your grass regularly eliminates ideal spaces for mosquitoes to live. Additionally, a well-maintained lawn will dry out faster after it rains, helping to reduce pools of standing water.

3. Use a mosquito control spray

To both prevent and eliminate mosquitoes, combine removing standing water and mowing your grass regularly with a mosquito control spray. There are many options for DIY yard sprays available, however, we recommend using a professional who can treat for mosquitoes at any stage of their life cycle, can monitor your property for its effectiveness, and will adjust as needed.

LawnMatters offers a complete mosquito control treatment program as well as one-time treatments for special outdoor events. If you are experiencing a mosquito infestation or are interested in learning more about our mosquito services, please contact us:
East side: (440) 834-1255
West side: (440) 933-8181

Lawn Care Tips for Fall

In Northeast Ohio, maintaining a good fall lawn care schedule is key to ensuring your grass survives the winter and is healthy when spring arrives. Here are a few fall lawn care tips to keep your lawn in top condition throughout the season:

1. Rake or Mulch Your Leaves

While pretty to look at and fun to jump in, a blanket of leaves over grass is not good for your lawn. Fallen leaves block sunlight and prevent vital nutrients from getting to the grass underneath. Leaves also trap moisture, which leads to lawn fungus. Raking not only removes leaves but also breaks up thatch, allowing more vital nutrients to get to the soil. If you decide to ditch the rake, mulching your leaves into dime-sized pieces is a great alternative. As the leaves decompose, they enhance your soil.

2. Continue to Mow Your Lawn

As the seasons change, it might be tempting to stop mowing your lawn. However, grass grows until the first frost and keeping your grass long before winter puts it at risk for snow mold. 3 inches is the ideal height for grass. At this height, your lawn’s roots will reach the right depth to stay healthy through the winter.

3. Aerate Your Lawn

Because we have cool season grasses in Northeast Ohio, the best time to aerate your lawn is early spring or early fall. Compacted soil from frequent activity and thatch, or the appearance of brown and gray buildup from dead roots, stems, and grass, leaves less room for water to flow to your lawn’s roots. Aeration breaks up soil compaction and thatch by removing small plugs or “cores” from the soil, allowing essential nutrients like air, water, and fertilizer to penetrate the root system, which creates a stronger, healthier lawn.

4. Overseed Your Lawn

If you are struggling with thinning grass, the perfect time to overseed your lawn, or add seed to existing grass, is right after core aeration. This ensures the new grass seeds make good contact with the nutrient rich soil, allowing for optimal growing conditions. In addition to a fuller, healthier lawn, as the grass thickens, it makes it harder for weeds to grow.

5. Fertilize Your Lawn

Fertilizing your lawn in fall helps restore damage that was caused by the stress of summer heat, promotes nutrient storage for use in the winter, and supports healthy root growth, which creates a healthier lawn in spring. It also helps to break down leaves, adding additional nutrients to your soil.

 

Contact LawnMatters

LawnMatters offers professional lawn care services for every season, including fall. If you have questions about your lawn, or would like help maintaining a good fall lawn care schedule contact us here or give us a call:

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

How to Get Rid of Armyworms

This year, homeowners throughout Northeast Ohio are experiencing unexpected armyworm infestations in their lawns. Armyworms look like harmless caterpillars but can destroy lawns in days by feeding on grass blades. While it’s hard to pinpoint the exact cause for the uptick in these destructive pests, above-average rains in August and September create ideal conditions for eggs to survive while storms help flying adult armyworm moths escape from natural predators.

What do Armyworms Look Like?

In the larval stage, armyworms are about 1 1/2 to 2 inches long, have a distinctive inverted “Y” mark on their dark-colored heads, and have green, yellow, red, or brown stripes down their sides and backs. Adult armyworm moths measure about 1 1/2 inches across. Their front wings are dark gray with light and dark splotches, and they have pale gray-white hind wings.

Signs of an Armyworm Infestation

Small brown patches of grass, rodents, or a large number of birds in your lawn are usually the first indication of an armyworm infestation. Also keep an eye out for jagged grass blades or bare spots where grass has been chewed to the ground. Armyworms eat the green layer of grass blades, giving grass a transparent, windowpane look.

How to Treat Armyworms in Your Lawn

Because we have cool season grasses in Ohio, armyworms can be particularly devastating to your lawn if not identified and treated right away. Armyworms are most active in the early morning or late evening, if you can, time up treatments with active feeding times. To treat your lawn, apply an insecticide as soon as damage or armyworms are present. Insecticides can also be applied as a preventative.

Can My Lawn Recover from Armyworms?

It may be possible for your lawn to recover from an armyworm infestation with proper fertilization, watering, and mowing. For help determining the best armyworm treatment and recovery plan for your lawn, contact the lawn care professionals at LawnMatters.

How to Prepare Your Lawn and Landscape for Winter

With a few simple steps, you can prepare your lawn and landscape for winter weather, ensuring it comes back healthy once spring arrives.

1. First, winterize your lawn

Continue to mow: It’s important to continue to mow your lawn up until the first frost. This keeps your lawn healthy and reduces your chances of getting snow mold. Your final mow of the year should be kept short at 2″.

Apply fertilizer: Prepare your lawn for winter with a fall fertilizer application. Fall fertilizer helps restore damage to grass caused by the stress of summer heat, promotes nutrient storage, and supports root growth, which creates a healthier lawn in spring.

Remove and treat weeds: Ensure the pesky weeds you’ve been dealing with all summer long don’t survive winter and return in spring by using a broad leaf herbicide to spot treat problem areas.

Aerate and reseed: Break up soil compaction and thatch with aeration, allowing essential nutrients like air, water, and fertilizer to penetrate your lawn’s root system before winter weather. Cooler temperatures, frequent rain, and a freshly aerated lawn make fall a great time to fill in bare spots with grass seeds, which will help create a thicker lawn in spring.

2. Next, winterize your trees and shrubs

Wrap trees: Paper tree wrap protects bark from permanent damage caused by animals, like rabbits and deer, insects, freezing cold winds and sunscald.

Spray trees and shrubs with an anti-transpirant: Freezing winds can suck the moisture from exposed trees and shrubs, which can result in wind burn, drought, and ultimately winter kill. Wilt proofing your trees and shrubs with an anti-transpirant adds a protective coating to the branches and stems, which ensures moisture does not escape during high-stress times.

3. Finally, winterize your landscape

Rake leaves: Fallen leaves block sunlight and prevent vital nutrients from getting to the grass underneath. Leaves also trap moisture, which leads to lawn fungus. Raking not only removes leaves but also breaks up thatch, allowing vital nutrients to get to the soil.

Clean up flower beds: Removing dead plants and leaves increases air and water flow while reducing the chances of pests overwintering in the debris and returning once spring arrives. Be sure to remove any dead branches from trees and shrubs to prevent heavy snow and ice buildup that could harm your plants.

 

Contact LawnMatters

LawnMatters offers professional lawn care services for every season. If you have questions about your lawn, or would like help preparing your lawn and landscape for winter, contact us here or give us a call:

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

How to Grow a Greener, Healthier Lawn

Growing a greener, healthier lawn might be easier than you think. With a few basic steps before planting grass seeds, followed by simple maintenance, you can add a beautiful and relaxing outdoor space to your home. Here’s our guide to growing a lawn your entire family can enjoy:

pH test your soil

Before you plant grass, determine if your soil is missing vital nutrients for healthy grass growth with a pH soil test. In Northeast Ohio, grass typically flourishes in soil with a pH range between 6.0 and 7.0. If your soil’s pH is too acidic or too alkaline, you can correct it by adding ground limestone or compost respectively. Soil testing will also help you choose the best fertilizer for your lawn.

Choose the right grass seeds

If you live in Northeast Ohio, you’ll want to plant cool-season grass. This includes tall and red fescues, perennial ryegrass, and Kentucky bluegrass. When choosing your seeds, read the product label to be sure you’ve chosen the appropriate blend for the amount of sunlight your lawn receives.

Overseed an existing lawn

Overseeding or adding grass seeds to an existing lawn is a great way to get a healthier, thicker looking lawn. Before spreading seeds, you should mow the grass, remove any lawn debris, and break up the top layer of soil. Aerating your lawn prior to overseeding is an excellent way to make sure that the grass seeds reach the soil and absorb the vital nutrients they need for healthy growth.

Plant grass at the appropriate time

The best time to plant cool-season grass is in the late spring or early fall when the temperature outside remains between 60-75 degrees and it’s unlikely to frost. Planting in the spring or fall also ensures the there is enough sunlight to germinate the seeds.

Water your lawn

One of the keys to healthy lawn is having grass with deep roots. To develop deep, healthy roots, your lawn needs enough water. Lawns typically need 1-2 inches of water per week; however, this can vary depending on the temperature and soil conditions. Newly planted grass needs moderately moist soil, so water your new grass every day until it is approximately 2 inches in height.

Maintain your lawn

Maintain your new green grass with continuous monitoring and maintenance. Once your lawn has grown a few inches, it’s time to mow. Mowing on a regular basis will help keep your grass thicker and healthier. Torn grass blades are more susceptible to lawn diseases and pests, so be sure your mower blades are sharp.

Check your lawn for weeds and spot treat as needed. Weeds steal water and nutrients and block sunlight from grass. Controlling weeds ensures your lawn gets the nourishment it needs to stay healthy.

Last, maintain a lawn fertilization schedule. Fertilizer ensures your grass receives the essential nutrients it needs for proper growth and will also help it fight off weeds all season long.

 

Contact LawnMatters

If you would like help growing a greener healthier lawn, contact the lawn care professionals at LawnMatters.

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

Tree and Shrub Care: Fertilizer and Insect Control

Trees and shrubs enhance your landscape and add beauty to your home. With proper fertilization and insect control, you can ensure your plants flourish during the growing season and continue to thrive year after year, helping to protect the investment you’ve made into your home’s curb appeal.

 

How to maintain healthy trees and shrubs in Northeast Ohio:

 

1. Ensure plants get the proper nutrients with fertilizer

Give your trees and shrubs the right amount of nutrients to support new and healthy growth with fertilizer. Fertilizer supplements the nutrients that soil alone can’t provide and helps your plants look greener and produce more flowers. Be sure to use the right amount of fertilizer for each type of plant and their location in your yard.

What is deep root fertilization?

Large trees are a valuable investment to your property. It’s important that they get the nutrients they need to grow strong and healthy. There are two effective ways to fertilize large trees: Deep Root Injection and Surface Drench Feeding. Both methods are highly effective and deliver fertilizer to where trees need it most, the roots.  Learn more about the benefits of deep root feeding.

 

2. Prevent and control insects and diseases

Preventative and curative tree and shrub sprays treat many types of insects and diseases. When properly used, these sprays ensure that your trees and shrubs don’t suffer any irreparable damages caused by invasive pests, like Japanese beetles and aphids, and common diseases, like apple scab.

 

3.Protect your plants from mites with dormant oil

Dormant oil is designed to control mites that hibernate in the branches, trunks, and buds of trees and shrubs that lose their leaves during the winter months. When dormant oil is applied in early spring, it prevents the eggs from formerly hibernating insects from hatching.

 

4. Protect plants from winter weather with an anti-transpirant

Freezing cold winds can suck the moisture from exposed trees and shrubs, which can result in wind burn, drought, and winter kill. Using an anti-transpirant, or wilt proofing, adds a protective coating to the branches and stems of your trees and shrubs, which promotes healthier blooms and greener leaves in the spring. Learn more about how to protect your trees and shrubs in winter.

 

At LawnMatters, we understand the value your trees and shrubs bring to your landscape. Our professionals are readily equipped with the knowledge to properly fertilize and protect your trees and shrubs from insects and diseases.

If you would like help with tree and shrub care, contact the lawn care professionals at LawnMatters.

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

Lawn Watering Tips: How Long to Water Your Lawn

Nothing is better than relaxing on soft, cool grass on a warm, sunny day in Northeast Ohio. But if you take a seat and notice your lawn is not feeling so soft and is looking dull in color, it’s time to water.

How much water does my lawn need?

Established lawns

Most established lawns need about 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week. This keeps the top 6 to 8 inches of soil, where turfgrass roots grow, moist. You want water to soak the soil deeply to help your grass develop strong roots and drought resistance, so break up watering into one or two applications per week instead of watering daily.

Newly seeded or sodded lawns

When watering a newly seeded or sodded lawn, it’s important to keep the top inch of the soil moist. Mist the area once or twice a day, ensuring it does not become soggy. When the grass reaches about 3 inches and can be mowed, you can begin watering one to two times per week.

How long should I water my lawn?

The number of minutes you should water your Northeast Ohio lawn varies depending on its size, the type of sprinkler you are using, and how much rain you’ve had that week. To ensure that your lawn gets the recommended 1 to 1.5 inches, try a can test. Place a small can or bucket within your sprinkler’s range. Turn the sprinkler on and time how long it takes to measure a .5 inch of water. Then multiply that by two or three to determine how many minutes it will take for your lawn to receive 1 to 1.5 inches of water.

When is the best time to water my grass?

The best time to water your lawn is in the morning, usually before 10 AM. Because it’s cooler in the morning, the water is less likely to evaporate. If you can’t water in the morning, water between 4 PM and 6 PM, which gives your lawn enough time to dry before night fall. If water sits too long on your grass overnight, it can cause fungal lawn diseases.

 

If you would like help maintaining a greener, healthier lawn in Northeast Ohio, contact the lawn care professionals at LawnMatters.

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

How to Overseed a Lawn: Your Complete Guide

How to Overseed a Lawn: Your Complete Guide

Nothing is better than getting to enjoy the great outdoors from the comfort of your own home. That’s why many of us spend a lot of time and energy maintaining our lawn and landscape. However, despite doing your best to care for it, after much use, your lawn can begin to appear worn and patchy. Overseeding is an effective way to improve the look and health of your grass so you can continue enjoying your time outside.

Why Overseed Your Lawn?

Overseeding, or adding seed to your existing lawn, creates thicker grass, which prevents weeds and helps reduce the appearance of damage.

How to Choose the Right Grass Seeds for an Ohio Lawn:

If you live in Northeast Ohio, you’ll want to plant cool-season grass. This includes tall and red fescues, perennial ryegrass, and Kentucky bluegrass. When choosing your seeds, read the product label to be sure you’ve chosen the appropriate blend for the amount of sunlight your lawn receives.

Step-by-Step Guide to Overseeding Your Lawn

Step 1: Mow Existing Lawn

Before you spread grass seeds it’s important to mow and rake your lawn. Mowing ensures your seeds easily reach the soil and raking will remove any debris or clumps of grass.

Step 2: Prepare the Soil

To prepare your lawn’s soil for overseeding, first remove any weeds from the area where you plan to spread the seeds. Then we recommend using a pH test to determine if your soil is missing vital nutrients for healthy grass growth. In Northeast Ohio, grass typically flourishes in soil with a pH range between 6.0 and 7.0. If your soil’s pH is too acidic or too alkaline, you can correct it by adding ground limestone or compost respectively. Soil testing will also help you choose the best fertilizer for your lawn.

Step 3: Spread the Grass Seeds

Once you’ve chosen the best grass seeds for your lawn it’s time to spread. The easiest way to spread the seeds evenly is to use a seed spreader, which you can typically find at a local DIY store. It’s important to read the seed packaging label to ensure you spread at the correct rate.

Step 4: Fertilize

Fertilizer ensures your grass receives the essential nutrients it needs for proper growth and will also help it fight off weeds. Use the pH soil test mentioned above to help you choose the right fertilizer for your lawn. Read more about when to fertilize your lawn.

Step 5: Water

After you’ve planted and fertilized your grass, it’s time to water. When watering a newly seeded lawn, it’s important to keep the top inch of the soil moist. Mist the area once or twice a day, ensuring it does not become soggy. When the grass reaches about 3 inches and can be mowed, you can begin watering one to two times per week. Learn more about watering your lawn.

Lawn Overseeding Services

If you need help creating or maintaining a beautiful and thriving lawn, the lawn care experts at LawnMatters can help. Contact us to learn more.

Getting Rid of Weeds Permanently: Weed Prevention and Control

Weed prevention and control is essential for maintaining a beautiful lawn. Learn how to prevent weeds before they take root and how to control them if they do end up in your lawn.

The Difference Between Weeds and Grass

A weed is a general term for an unwanted, wild plant that grows in lawns and landscapes. The most common weeds we see growing in Northeast Ohio lawns include crabgrass, dandelions, and white clover. Weeds are categorized as annual or perennial. Annual weeds die after one growing season. Perennial weeds continue to grow year after year. Both types of weeds can spread quickly through an undernourished, weak lawn if not treated and controlled right away. Grass on the other hand, is a specific type of perennial plant that is often intentionally grown by homeowners to create a beautiful and esthetically pleasing landscape.

Preventing Weeds from Taking Over Your Yard

You can prevent weeds from taking over your yard using a variety of methods as a part of your regular lawn care routine. First, use a preemergent herbicide in spring, which will help prevent weeds from germinating. If weeds have already begun to grow in your lawn, apply a post emergent herbicide. Another highly effective way to get rid of weeds is to simply hand pull them, ensuring you get the roots, or the weeds will be back in no time.

Start fertilizing your lawn in spring. Fertilizer ensures your grass gets the nutrients it needs to grow, helping it stay healthy and thick, which blocks out weeds. To get the maximum results from your fertilizer, water 24 hours after an application. This helps nutrients get absorbed into the soil and the fertilizer off grass blades, preventing leaf burn. Mowing on a regular basis promotes healthy grass growth too, which keeps it thicker, helping to control weeds.

Using Herbicides Safely

If you choose to use herbicides, make sure you follow label instructions carefully. Always read labels and follow directions exactly as written.

Can You Control Weeds Without Herbicides?

There are several ways to prevent and control weeds without using herbicides, however, we find the most effective way to treat weeds in your lawn is to combine herbicides with regular mowing, watering and fertilization.

Planting cover crops such as clover, alfalfa, or rye grass can suppress weeds and prevent them from growing. Another option is to plant perennial flowers in garden beds such as marigolds, petunias, or impatiens. They also provide good ground cover and attract beneficial insects. Finally, mulch is another effective weed deterrent. Mulching helps soil retain moisture, keeps soil temperatures cooler, and blocks sunlight, which all reduce weed growth.

No matter the time of year or status of your weeds, one of the best ways to prevent and control weeds is to call the lawn care experts at LawnMatters. Our weed prevention and control program destroys common Ohio weeds, right down to their roots.

If you’d like help preventing and eliminating weeds, contact us here or give us a call:

East side: (440) 834-1255

West side: (440) 933-8181

Lime Treatments for Your Lawn: What Lime Does to Soil and When to Apply It

Cool-season grasses that grow in Northeast Ohio, like tall and red fescues, perennial ryegrass, and Kentucky bluegrass, typically flourish in soil with a pH range between 6.0 and 7.0. If your lawn’s soil pH is too acidic or too alkaline, it prevents your grass from absorbing essential nutrients, causing it to turn yellow or brown, and in some cases, it may even die. However, with the right soil pH, your grass will become healthier and greener, which is why you may want to consider testing your soil and adding a lime treatment to your lawn care schedule.

What is Lime?

Lime, sometimes called garden lime, is ground up limestone. It is used to change the pH of soil that is too acidic, making it easier for plants to absorb nutrients. Additionally, lime contains calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate, which are essential for healthy grass growth.

Why Add Lime to Your Lawn?

Lime balances your soil’s pH. In Northeast Ohio, when your soil’s pH is between 6-7 it can more easily absorb nutrients especially from fertilizers, which ultimately help develop strong grass roots creating a healthier lawn.

Signs that Your Lawn May Need Lime

In general, if you are maintaining and watering your lawn regularly and it still looks unhealthy, your soil is likely too acidic, and it might be a good time to conduct a soil test. Here are a few other signs your lawn may need lime:

  • Your grass has become yellow or brown in color
  • You’ve noticed moss throughout your lawn
  • You see an increase of weeds, lawn diseases and pests
  • Your lawn appears to be thinning

When is the Best Time of Year to Apply Lime?

The best time of year to apply lime to your lawn is in the spring or fall. Because it takes a few months for lime to break down into the soil, LawnMatters recommends adding lime in fall. The increase of rain and snow combined with the freeze thaw cycle throughout the winter will help integrate the lime into the soil, preparing it just in time for new grass growth in spring. However, if your lawn is too stressed or wilted from a harsh summer, we may suggest waiting until spring for treatment.

If you decide to treat your lawn with lime on your own, be sure to review your soil test to ensure you are using the correct amount of lime based on your soil type and pH results.

Greater Cleveland Ohio Lawn Care Services

LawnMatters offers lime treatment services for all grass and soil types in Northeast Ohio. We can help you create stronger grass roots that improve the thickness and overall health of your turf. Contact us to learn more.

5 Winter Lawn Care Tips for Healthy Grass in Spring

As the seasons change from fall to winter your grass will start to go dormant. It will slowly stop growing and need less and less of your time and attention. While you may welcome this break from yard work, there are a few things you should do before winter to ensure your grass comes back healthy and thriving in spring.

  1. Remove Leaves and Lawn Debris

Any leaves and lawn debris left on your lawn over winter will mat down grass under the weight of heavy snowfall, trapping moisture, which could lead to lawn fungus. Additionally, leaves block sunlight and prevent vital nutrients from getting to the grass underneath.

Raking is a great way to remove leaves and debris while also breaking up thatch, which helps more air and nutrients reach your lawn’s soil. If you need a break from the rake, you can also mulch your leaves into dime-sized pieces using a mulching mower.

  1. Apply a Pre-emergent Weed Control Treatment

A great step in preventing early spring weeds is actually taking a preventatives step in the fall with a pre-emergent weed control application. Pre-emergent herbicides don’t entirely stop weed germination and growth but will help control it.

  1. Apply a Post-emergent Weed Control Treatment

Finally say “good-bye” to the pesky weeds you couldn’t seem to get rid of all summer long with a post-emergent herbicide. This herbicide should be sprayed directly on the target weed, which will systematically attack its root system. Using a post-emergent herbicide and harsh winter weather conditions will make it very hard for a weed to continue to grow, hopefully resulting in complete elimination.

  1. Mow Your Lawn Until the First Frost

Even as temperatures start dropping and your grass appears to be growing less and less, it’s important to continue to mow your lawn up until the first frost. This helps reduce the amount of moisture that will be trapped on your lawn under snow, helping prevent lawn diseases, like snow mold. Lower your lawn mower blades to mow the grass short, about 2”, for the final mow of the year.

  1. Fertilize Your Lawn Before the First Frost

Fertilizer is an important step in your lawn care routine that ensures your grass gets the nutrients it needs to stay strong, healthy, and thick, which also helps it fight off weeds and other lawn diseases year-round.

Prepare your lawn for winter with a fall fertilizer application before the first frost. Fall fertilizer helps restore damage to grass caused by the stress of summer heat, promotes nutrient storage, and supports root growth, which creates a healthier lawn in spring. We recommend planning your last two fertilizer applications between late August and November.

Cleveland Ohio Lawn Care Services

LawnMatters offers lawn care services in Northeast Ohio for every season. If you’d like help preparing your lawn for winder, please contact us to learn how we can help.

Fall Lawn Maintenance Checklist

Fall in Northeast Ohio – temperatures are dropping, trees are changing colors, and every time you think you can put your rake away more leaves seem to fall on your lawn. Many enjoy the change in seasons and spending time outside in the cool air, despite nature’s yard work. Ultimately, the extra time and energy you put into maintaining a good fall lawn care routine pays off though in spring when your grass comes back healthy and strong. Follow our fall lawn maintenance checklist to be sure you cover all the important steps in caring for your lawn before winter arrives.

  1. Clean up leaves

Leaves left on lawns through fall and winter prevent grass from getting the sunlight and air it needs to stay healthy. They also can trap moisture, which causes lawn diseases like snow mold. Raking also helps break up the soil, letting your lawn breathe. The circulation of fresh air eliminates compaction for a healthier, stronger yard.

  1. Mow Your Lawn

It’s important to continue to mow your lawn up until the first frost. Your final mow of the year should be kept short at 2″. Try using a mulching mower to chop up leaves into dime-sized pieces, which can give you a well-deserved break from raking while providing compost for your grass.

  1. Apply Fertilizer

Prepare your lawn for winter with a fall fertilizer application. Fall fertilizer helps restore damage to grass caused by the stress of summer heat, promotes nutrient storage for winter, and supports root growth, which creates a healthier lawn in spring.

  1. Treat Weeds

If you want to get rid of weeds permanently, start by treating them in the fall. Freezing temperatures will make them more susceptible to weed control treatments. You can also pull them by hand, just be sure you get the roots.

  1. Aerate and Seed

Thatch, or the appearance of brown and gray buildup on your lawn from dead roots, stems, and grass, compacts your lawn’s soil, leaving less room for essential nutrients to reach its roots. Aeration breaks up thatch by removing small plugs or “cores” from the soil, which allows air, water, and fertilizer to penetrate the root system creating a stronger, healthier lawn.

Cooler temperatures, frequent rain, and a freshly aerated lawn make fall a great time to fill in bare spots with grass seeds, which will help create a thicker lawn in spring, reducing the appearance of damage and patchy spots.

  1. Apply Lime

lime treatment will balance your soil’s pH. In Northeast Ohio, when your soil’s pH is between 6-7 it can more easily absorb nutrients especially from fertilizers, which ultimately help develop strong grass roots creating a healthier lawn.

The increase of rain and snow combined with the freeze thaw cycle throughout the fall and winter will help integrate the lime into the soil, preparing it just in time for new grass growth in spring. Be sure to get a soil test to ensure you are using the correct amount of lime based on your soil type and pH results.

Cleveland Ohio Lawn Care Services

LawnMatters offers lawn care services in Northeast Ohio for every season. If you’d like help maintaining your lawn this fall, please contact us to learn how we can help.

Should You Fertilize Your Lawn in Winter?

If you have lived in Northeast Ohio during the winter, you know this season is particularly unpredictable. On any given Monday it can be below zero and snowing, but by Tuesday it could be 54 degrees and sunny.

What you can predict about winter in Ohio is that when we are hit with a winter “heat wave”, that is any temperature above 32 degrees, people will be ready to spend some time outdoors taking care of their lawns and landscape.

Winter lawn care tips

When the snow melts and you start to see more and more of your green grass it might be tempting to try and give it some extra nutrients to get it through the winter. However, it is not necessary or beneficial to fertilize your lawn during the winter months.

The grass is dormant and not actively growing, so it is not able to effectively utilize the nutrients provided by fertilization. In fact, applying fertilizer during the winter can be harmful to your lawn as it can stimulate weak, new growth that is not able to withstand the cold temperatures and can be damaged by frost or freezing.

Some things you can do to take care of your Ohio lawn during the winter are:

  • Clear large piles of snow, which helps prevent snow mold
  • Remove leaves and other lawn debris that can prevent sunlight and air flow from reaching your grass, and trap moisture, which can cause lawn diseases
  • Cover vulnerable plants with burlap to protect them from salt used to melt ice
  • Prevent damage to your trees and shrubs by removing any lingering, heavy snow from branches

When should you start fertilizing your lawn?

Your first fertilizer application should take place in early spring when your grass first begins to grow. In Northeast Ohio, this is typically between March and April when temperatures start consistently staying near 50 degrees.

To get the maximum results from fertilizer, it is best to water within the first 24 hours after an application. This helps nutrients get absorbed into the soil and fertilizer off blades of grass, preventing leaf burn.

Cleveland Ohio Lawn Care Services

LawnMatters offers lawn care services in Northeast Ohio for every season. Please contact us to learn how we can help.

Three of the Most Common Lawn Weeds in Ohio & How to Identify Them

Three of the Most Common Lawn Weeds in Ohio & How to Identify Them

In Northeast, Ohio, spring is right around the corner. Many of us are ready for warm weather so we can start enjoying the outdoors again.

The arrival of spring also means it’s time to start thinking about your lawn. Before you know it, it will be time to mow, plant and water. To be sure your lawn stays healthy this season, it’s also important to consider adding regular weed control applications to your lawn care routine. This can help prevent and treat some of the most common lawn weeds in Ohio, including dandelions, creeping Charlie, and white clover, from taking over your lawn.

How to Identify Dandelions, Creeping Charlie, and White Clover

What Does a Dandelion Look Like?

A lawn dandelion is a bright yellow flower that is about 2-3 inches wide. The flowers sit on top of a hollow, leafless stem that can grow up to 12 inches tall. Dandelions also produce a white, fluffy seed head, which is a ball of seeds that is attached to a stem. The seeds are easily dispersed by the wind, making them easily spreadable from lawn to lawn.

What Does Creeping Charlie Look Like?

Creeping Charlie, also known as Ground Ivy, has small, round or kidney-shaped, scalloped leaves that are typically 2-3 inches in length. The leaves are dark green on a creeping stem. Creeping Charlie can spread rapidly and form dense mats. This lawn weed also produces small, pale purple flowers that typically appear in the spring.

What Does White Clover Look Like?

White clover is a common lawn weed that has small, white flowers that are about 1/4 inch wide. The flowers are arranged in clusters and are typically found at the end of long, thin stems. The leaves of white clover are typically green and are oval or circular in shape. White clover grows low to the ground, forming dense patches that can crowd out your lawn grass.

How to Prevent Common Lawn Weeds

Not only do weeds make your grass look patchy but as they grow, they block sunlight and steal water and nutrients away from your lawn. Use a weed prevention spray in the spring to fight off weeds before they take root. If you see weeds starting to grow, use a post-emergent spray to spot treat weeds as needed. Learn more about how to prevent weeds from growing in your lawn.

Fertilizing your lawn can also help it fight off weeds. Fertilizer ensures your grass gets the nutrients it needs to grow, helping it stay healthy and thick, which blocks out weeds. To get the maximum results from your fertilizer, water within 48 hours after an application. This helps nutrients get absorbed into the soil and the fertilizer off grass blades, preventing leaf burn. Learn more about fertilizing your lawn.

Lawn Care Experts in Northeast Ohio

If you’d like help preventing weeds like dandelions, creeping Charlie, and white clover from taking over your lawn this spring, contact the lawn care experts at LawnMatters.

Common Causes of Brown Patches in Your Lawn & How to Repair Them

A beautiful, green lawn can be a source of pride for any homeowner, but brown patches can quickly ruin the look of your outdoor space. Brown patches in your lawn can be caused by a variety of factors, with the most common being over or under-watering, fungus, pests, and thatch. The good news is that once you identify what’s causing the patches, repairing your lawn is possible!

Common Causes of Brown Patches in Your Lawn

Before you can begin repairing your lawn, it’s important to identify the cause of the damage. This will help you determine the best course of action for remediation and prevent the brown patches from coming back.

Too much or too little water: When you over-water your lawn, its soil can become compacted, which makes it harder for water and air to reach your grass’s roots. It also leads to shallow root growth, which makes your grass more susceptible to damage from heat and drought.

When you don’t water your lawn enough, your grass can start to go dormant, causing it to turn brown or even die. Most established lawns need about 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week during the growing season. This keeps the top 6 to 8 inches of soil, where turfgrass roots grow, moist. You want water to soak the soil deeply to help your grass develop strong roots and drought resistance, so break up watering into one or two longer applications per week instead of shorter daily applications.

Lawn Fungus: Yards that have dead, brown sections and bare spots can be the result of lawn fungus or disease. If left untreated, the problem may continue to spread and cause severe damage. Fungus can be caused by a variety of factors but most commonly it’s due to weather conditions like heat/humidity. Overwatering or continuous wet conditions, soil compaction, or mowing your lawn too short are other factors that may lead to fungus.

Grubs: Grubs are small, soft-bodied insects with six legs. They live in soil to feed on decaying organic matter and are often mistaken for worms because they move slowly through the ground. If left untreated, grubs will destroy beautiful lawns in days by eating away at the root system, leaving you with bare spots, brown areas, and less dense sections.

Signs of grubs in your lawn include soft, spongy grass that can easily be pulled back. An increase in birds, racoons, or other wild animals digging in your lawn can also be an indication of a grub infestation.

Thatch: Thatch, or the appearance of brown and gray buildup on your lawn from dead roots, stems, and grass, compacts your lawn’s soil, leaving less room for essential nutrients to reach its roots, causing it to be stressed and turn brown. You can break up thatch using a rake.

How to Repair Brown Patches in Your LawnHow to Repair Brown Patching in Your Lawn

Once you’ve identified the cause of the brown patches in your lawn, you’ll have a better understanding of how to prevent them from happening in the future and can also begin repairs

Step 1: Remove the Dead, Brown Grass

Use a rake or shovel to remove the dead grass and any other debris in the affected area. This will help prepare the soil for new grass seed.

Step 2: Prepare the Soil

After removing the dead grass, use a rake to loosen the soil in the affected area. If you are repairing a larger area, use a lawn aerator. Breaking up the soil will improve drainage and allow air and nutrients to reach the roots of your new grass seed.

We also recommend using a pH test to determine if your soil is missing vital nutrients for healthy grass growth. In Northeast Ohio, grass typically flourishes in soil with a pH range between 6.0 and 7.0. If your soil’s pH is too acidic or too alkaline, you can correct it by adding ground limestone or compost respectively.

Step 3: Seed the Area

Once you’ve chosen the best grass seeds for your lawn it’s time to spread. The easiest way to spread the seeds evenly is to use a seed spreader, which you can typically find at a local DIY store.

Step 4: Fertilize

Fertilizer ensures your grass receives the essential nutrients it needs for proper growth and will also help it fight off weeds. Learn more about fertilizing your lawn.

Step 5: Water

After you’ve planted and fertilized your grass, it’s time to water. When watering a newly seeded lawn, it’s important to keep the top inch of the soil moist. Mist the area once or twice a day, ensuring it does not become soggy. When the grass reaches about 3 inches and can be mowed, you can begin watering one to two times per week. Learn more about watering your lawn.

Note: If your lawn has grubs, you should also apply a grub control treatment before planting new grass.

The best way to prevent brown patches from coming back is to keep up with a regular lawn maintenance routine that includes mowing, watering, fertilizing and weed control applications.

Lawn Care Services

If you need help repairing brown patches in your lawn, the lawn care experts at LawnMatters can help. Contact us to learn more.

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